Lessons from Lizards

Lessons from Lizards by Rosa Blue
Lessons from Lizards, a photo by Rosa Blue on Flickr.

“Wait, Look!” I said to the group.  “There’s a whole family of little lizards over here!”

Alas.  

My horticultural companions continued on with their short journey to the Green House.  The little seeds we had just planted in pots needed a place to sit and ponder on their life for a while.  

While volunteering in the small Horticultural Healing group, I often, perhaps too often, get distracted by the creatures living around the gardens.  

I had never seen lizards up close before I started going to the gardens and taking photographs.  

My first love in the gardens was a little lizard who lived in an abandoned Cabbage patch in one of the raised beds.  I’ve met several more since then, but I must admit, none have been as special as the one in the Cabbage patch, who I met in Spring 2012.  He (or she) and I communicated for a few days, before he moved on after realizing that us gardeners, who had invaded his Winter home, had come to stay a while.

I have since also fallen in-love with a Baby Turtle (BT) and a Frog.

I stopped to see the little lizards.  I would have liked the Green House.  I love it so, especially in Winter, when warmth is inviting and the green life is healing.

The lizards had my attention.  I’m not sure they really liked me photographing them. 

Nature has a way of asking me to be more aware so as not to get too close when I meet her wild children. 

The little lizards peeked out at me from beneath the picnic table, crawling from the crevices onto the wooden wall.  Clearly, they didn’t want me in their space.  I tried not to disturb them.

Lizard crawling on Wood Wall

I’m not sure why I’m attracted to lizards, frogs and turtles.  I knew I loved Butterflies, and all Mother Nature’s critters, but there’s something about these reptilian creatures that draw me into their world.

Lately, I keep getting the message to slow down, be more aware of my environment, and taking a little time to think before I take action.  I bet lizards do that.

Horticulture Therapy, even as a volunteer within the group, gently offers me lessons in life.

I didn’t feel like being around people this week, but I went to the group anyway.  I had hopes that my poor mood would be accepted, and I believe it was. 

After planting a few seeds and taking them to the Green House, the Horticulture Therapy Intern suggested a hike, and for unknown reasons to me, I didn’t want to go, which I communicated with her. 

I wanted to stay back, alone, but she didn’t offer me time to consider this option.  Within a few minutes of being in the woods, we came to the creek.  It was beautiful.  I remembered the many days my late dog friend, Free, enjoyed swimming and rolling in mud there. 

Clear creek in Winter woods

Leaving the water, I spotted a bird perched high in the branches of a tree.  “Look everyone!” 

I was excited and didn’t mean to tell folks what to do next when I said, “Be still.” 

I wanted them to see the awesome bird and when they did, I felt a connection.  Being alone wasn’t as appealing to me.  I was glad we were there together.

walking together

I got a few shots of the bird, although not very clear ones, and then it flew away into the misty woods.

Birds of Prey

“It’s an omen,” the Intern remarked.  “I believe in those things.” 

I felt like she was talking to me, but I wasn’t sure.  After seeing the beautiful bird, I noticed how much lighter were the burdens I carried.

Thank you for visiting Green Healing Notes.

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Green Healing in Horticulture

I like to call this garden the Therapy Bed.  These are some of the Fall greens growing.  Yummy and Gorgeous growing together!

This garden is very special, which I’ve probably said here before.  A healing energy surrounds it.  I can feel it in the food that grows there.

The Therapy Bed was home to the Summer Tithonia Garden and brought many species of beautiful butterflies!  I was extremely grateful for the opportunity to spend time there and to the woman who planted them because they are by far one of my very favorite flowers.

You can see an interesting piece of art from this year’s Sculpture in the Garden show in the background of the photo (above).  The white curves remind me of the old-time soft-serve ice cream we used to get in the small town I grew up in.

I’ve missed several group meetings (as a volunteer in Horticulture Therapy) over the past couple of months, due to health issues and stressful circumstances, but am so glad that my son has been able to attend and bring home the greens!

I look forward to participating in the colder weather horticultural activities, like when they make Christmas wreaths and aromatic herb bags. 

Oddly, when I’ve been unable to attend the group gatherings, I’ve found myself piddling around in my yard or more often, taking care of the container plants still living on my decks.

The big Terracotta filled with Chives, Thyme and the most wonderful ground cover called Carpet Mint are still quite nice.  The Mint isn’t visible, but I hope it comes back next year. 

I must admit, although I get a lot from being with my plants or walking through the woods, it isn’t a replacement for being with a group of people in Horticulture Therapy (HT).  Healing really does happen in HT and I love it!

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Healthy Greens Growing Together

 

Tending the Garden

Squash plant, up close“I can water the gardens,” I remember saying with hopeful enthusiasm after the horticulture therapist said they needed a volunteer to help. I can’t believe how fast time has passed since then. 

I’ve been enjoying this job for several months.  My son volunteers as well and often helps.  I like it when he comes with me.  I think most plant people like watering the garden.  It’s easier than digging or pulling weeds and seeing the plants and flowers perk up after a drink is refreshing.  I usually take photos when he goes with me, but I tend to do that almost every time I go.

I was on my own yesterday.  It was late in the day to be watering, but the wind had been blowing for most of the day and kept things rather cool.  Every few minutes the trees swayed and I heard their leaves rustling.  It was a good day to water.

The different colors and wonderful aromas stimulate my mind.  The shapes and textures of leaves or fruit and vegetables capture my full attention.  I adore the busy garden creatures. 

And of course, I love it when we harvest food.  There is a strong connection to the land and earth when I eat food that I helped grow.  There’s something special that happens when you gather up greens or pull out carrots and garlic from the dirt.  I do believe with all my heart and soul that food taste better when it comes from your garden.  It’s a Green Healing happening to eat homegrown food!.

Tomato, in Red

I enjoy being a volunteer for many reasons, one of which is obviously that I get to be in a beautiful environment with nice people.  I also like the responsibility.  I think my son does too. 

I may need a little more help watering the gardens.  The hose is heavy and I thought I’d get used to it, but I’m fatigued.  Doctors say I have fibromyalgia.  I know for sure I have chronic pain and fatigue.  The key to controlling the pain, I guess, is not over doing things, which is challenging.  Plus, I forget about pain when I’m in the gardens.  I love that, but I’ve discovered that I must find a balance.

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