Sycamore Sky and Robin

 

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American Robin Listening for Worms

“Sounds like A Worm to Me!” 

American Robin

new camera 2835Robins are a fun bird to watch! 

I mentioned in an earlier post that a neighbor and I were birdwatching together one day, when he told me the American Robin hops, and then stops, so that it may hear a worm. 

So, you can imagine my delight when I captured a few images of this Robin listening for what I feel safe in assuming, worms! 

I can’t think of a better springtime song for a Robin, as the sound of a worm in the cool dirt.

robin march listeningThanks for visiting Green Healing Notes!

The Red-Breasted Winter Flock

My son was first to see the flock of Robins, alerting me with an excitement I hadn’t heard in a great long time.  That was a blessing in itself.

“Mom! You gotta come see!” he exclaimed.  “Just for a minute,” he added.

I knew I had to go see what he saw.  I made it to the door in time to see the flock of American Robins gracefully landing on the moist and cold grassy lawn.  The slight sound of their wings in flight, I can still recall.  I like that.

I am grateful to be alive in these moments. Life is not easy, at least not for me, so when nature shows her awe, I do take notice.  I catch a trillionth second wind moving me to carry on.

The red-breasted beauties hopped, stopped, and hopped again.  My neighbor said they they hear worms, so they stop briefly to listen for them.  I don’t doubt this, because bird brains are pretty darn smart!   I do however wonder if wintertime lawns have worms to offer.

A fully grown man, my son, stood with me watching the birds, both of us glad to be there, together, without words and absolutely taken by the moment.

(Originally posted on Flickr.  Edited on January 28th, 2014).

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The Winter Resident

Robin on a cold day in North Carolina

Winter Sighting, American Robin

A bird does not sing because it has an answer.  It sings because it has a song.  ~Chinese Proverb

I watched, as our recent winged visitor, a fat and sassy Robin, walked along the porch railing by the Holly tree.  Big white fluffy snowflakes were falling.   Everything was quiet, except for the beautiful bird songs, both of which I love.

The Robin didn’t seem to mind the snow.  I wasn’t surprised.  He (or she) has guarded the Holly tree and it’s cherished bright red berries since arriving a few weeks earlier.

Holly Berries

Note: I’m not experienced in identifying birds.  I made my best guess that the Robin pictured above is a male that has come to breed.

“Male robins arrive about the time that the average daily temperature is 37 degrees. (This fits the pattern of when the Robin arrived.  The bird also perches in a coniferous tree, with a clear view of the Holly berries).  “During cold or very wet weather, the males grow more silent and concentrate on feeding and taking shelter in thick conifer branches.”

Source: Journey North, American Robin (learner.org)

The above listed site is full of interesting facts and information about the American Robin.  You can take part in, “Winter Sightings,” and learn their five vocalizations.  (Listen to the Robin’s song: http://www.learner.org/jnorth/sounds/RobinSong_LangElliott.mp3).

Worms, please...

A Warmer Day

The Robin has certainly made his presence known to all.  I am quite sure he has claimed, at least temporarily, complete rights to the Holly tree and its bountiful fruit. 

Several species of birds have made it to my porch rail by the Holly tree, but not for long.  The few that ventured into the branches, trying to get a mere berry or two, well…

Without delay, the Robin lashed forth, thrusting his body at theirs.  The birds took flight in haste!

One day, the Red-bellied Woodpecker that’s usually seen in the backyard, visited the Holly tree.  Something was up that day, because all of a sudden, several birds came at once to the tree.

The Robin watched this spectacle, waited for about a minute and swoosh!  He went first for the Woodpecker.   Amazingly to me, that big Woodpecker flew away after one jolt from the healthy Robin. 

The other birds followed the Woodpecker, returning to their backyard haven, safe from the large-breasted Winter resident.

The recent soft snow brought with it a few birds I haven’t seen this year.

Wintery Day

a cold snowy winter day

One of the new birds (below) came to the Holly tree and it did meet the resident Robin on the porch rail.  I don’t think it flew into the tree, but I was able to get a few photos before it left.

snow falls on new visitor

snow falls on new visitor

Winter Birds Visit in SnowI haven’t yet identified the pretty little bird (above).  Do you know the name of this winged visitor?

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